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Stickied postModerator of r/labrats

Welcome to our month long vent thread! Now with 4X the coverage for your ranting needs. Vent and troubleshoot on our discord! https://discord.gg/385mCqr

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Stickied postModerator of r/labrats

How has your week been? Tell us all about your successful experiment(s) and about your 80,000 other failed ones! Discuss further on our discord! https://discord.gg/385mCqr

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Hey Reddit: Want to write better? Eliminate grammatical mistakes, wipe out wordiness, and let your ideas shine. See for yourself why over 15 million users are hooked on Grammarly's free writing app.

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Love this shirt! If you've written grants or manuscripts, you'll totally get it!

https://i.redd.it/shwrns2136421.png

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I get asked this question all the time and never no how to respond. May one of y'all knows the answer. If a person is preparing DNA, is it necessary to perform RNAse treatment prior to amplifying the 16S gene (say V4 to run on miseq)? Asked another way: will the presence of RNA interfere with or skew the community profile of DNA used for NGS metagenomic community profiling?

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A new antibody search engine with publication data

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Recently learned of an opportunity to work at NIH as a SRO. I understand it would be a transition from the hands on science to the administrative side. Anyone have any experience as a SRO and would like to share some pros/cons about the job? Thank you.

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We hear about how people left academia to join industry every day, but did anyone here leave their cushy industry job to rejoin academia? What influenced that decision?

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A fellow lab tech asked me if I could post this on reddit to potentially get some help:

"I was doing routine cell culture and plating human foreskin fibroblasts into wells with glass coverslips. The cells are not attaching and spreading out like normal fibroblasts. It cannot be the coverslips, these were cleaned very thoroughly. The coverslips are not coated but we have never coated them in the past for these cells. It is an older passage of cells so maybe that is why but the cells attach nicely to plastic when I plate them into flasks. 

Any reasons as to why this might be happening? And possible solutions. Also, I am starting over with a new vial of cells, media, trypsin just in case it could be contamination."

and the person sent me these photos: https://imgur.com/a/UftErSO

edit: I myself am not a cell-bio/biochem person and work in a completely unrelated lab(ecology)

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Hi everyone!

I'm an MSc student at a lab in Canada. I will be finishing up summer of 2019 and am looking to start a PhD somewhere in Europe in immunology/immunotherapy, specifically in relation in cancer. I am looking for tips in how to apply. I am most interested in the Switzerland, France and the Netherlands and see that some schools post vacancies for PhD position, and others do general applications. Do students in these countries usually apply to PhD's through the vacancy postings or directly to the supervisor? Additionally, are there any schools that really stand out as exceptional in these fields?

Any thoughts/input/tips/knowledge would be appreciated! Thanks!

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So I tried making a 1M solution of NaOH in CH3-O-CH2-CH2-OH and it wasn't actually soluble at that concentration (I ended up making a 1mM solution instead), but I left it sitting on my bench and by the next day it was pretty yellow (the solvent is colorless). Now it's as yellow as the solution of potassium ferricyanide in water I have sitting next to it.

I'm not very good at orgo and I'm just sorta curious. What happened to my solvent? Is the same thing gonna happened to my 1mM NaOH solution?

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Today night, I was doing some immunostaining to leave overnight with the primary antibody. I have three columns: A,B, and C. I put the coverslips on my parafilm wrapped glass plate (4 in A, 5 in B, and 4 in C). I swear they were all there. I put some cell fixture and leave them. I waltz back over and stare at my plate and I'm doing the wash and I'm like hold up. There's only four coverslips in Column B. WTF?

I immediately think fuck it's slipped off somewhere. I scan the bench. I'm like fuck how is it not here. This glass plate has not moved from my bench. Fast forward five minutes I've taken off my gloves and my nose is to the ground and I'm combing the ground and my bench searching searching... Nothing. I go back to my cell plates in the fridge thinking I must have missed a slide, that's the simplest explanation. Nope, I've taken one from each sample.

I'm still thinking about it. I don't like screwing up. But this is more than that. I'm straight up bamboozled where did it go.

What's something that happened to you that you have no explanation for?

EDIT: Welp, one coverslip was underneath another. I swear I checked that and didn't think they were stuck! Is it still usable? Currently redoing all the steps separately for this one, while the rest are in the fridge. Not sure if this is legit but I'm going to try. Sigh...

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Apologies for format, as using mobile app.

I am currently using d-limonene to mount polycarbonate, hydrophilic filters. The filters have been used to collect food and water related microorganisms and stained for detection by fluorescence. This is a practice that was in place when I started in that lab.

Due to allergies, I would like to switch to something else. Looking for recommendations.

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Our veterinary hospital just got a VCM device and I’m looking for advice for better utilising the data the machine provides, rather than just an idea of “hypercoagulable state” /normal/“hypocoagulable state” based on the graph the machine provides.

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Sometimes I clean my white shoes with different solvents and kimwipes, was wondering if anyone else has small things they do like that.

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Hello fellow lab rats

I had a graphic designer make a little infographic about liposomes for presentations and donor meetings.

Thought I'd share with you in case there is anybody out there who battles to explain nanotechnology to [non- science relative or friend of your choice].

If you want to use it just credit the original artist (its not me)

Original post: Vizual Explanations - Liposomes

------------------------------

Gerardo is a very talented graphic designer and overall nice person. If you would like to contact him for any graphic design work, see below: 

IG: https://www.instagram.com/gerardo_dlc/

Email: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected])

https://i.redd.it/i83urhkh83421.jpg

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Can anyone recommend a program to store and/or analyze large volumes of sequence data? I'm doing my undergraduate thesis studying (potential) allelic variation at 4 coding loci and have N = 300 sequences to compare. I'm super overwhelmed and my PI is a "figure it out yourself" kinda guy. I've also never done anything with population genetics, let alone on this scale. Any help or advice is mucho appreciated :)

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